Reviews

Read the Review
Plaster

Read the Review
Hyness

Read the Review
Black Suit Devil

Read the Review
Yamantaka // Sonic Titan

Read the Review
The Pack A.D.

Read the Review
Chad VanGaalen

Read the Review
Potengowski Anna Friederike

Read the Review
Todd Rundgren

Read the Review
Old 97's

Read the Review
Needles//Pins

Read the Review
Ohama

Read the Review
Nicolas Horvath

Read the Review
Hugo Wolf Quartet

Read the Review
Heat

Read the Review
Parallels

Read the Review
Monica Chapman

Read the Review
Alexis Baro & Pueblo Nuevo Jazz Project

Read the Review
Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings

Share |


Cover Art

Notes From The Underground ( )

Notes From the Underground
Stutter ( )
Named after Fyodor Dostoevsky's classic of the same name, the self-titled debut of Vancouver's Notes From Underground is a well-studied mix of Pixies howl, the jingle-jangle of 60s psychedelia, and, surprise-surprise, New York punk circa 1970. However, there is something a little bit off-kilter about the way these guys express their influences. One would think that an album with 10 songs in just under 30 minutes would fly by, however, for some reason, this just isn't the case. The album begins with the Notes' two strongest tracks: "Hey Hey Hey (Second Chance)" and "Run and Hide." The first starts with some typical garage rock riffage a la the Modern Lovers before vocalist Geoff Thompson busts into some Surferosa-styled shrieking. The second is a hummable pop tune complete with a trumpet melody that spars successfully with the rhythm. This extra instrumentation adds depth to the Notes' sound, thus making the track the album's high point. It was a sad state of affairs, then, when I discovered that the rest of the album tends to just rehash the few ideas expressed in the first two tracks. Unfortunately, not much can be said about an album that does not say a whole lot itself. To be fair, however, this album is not a total bore. The punchy "Rescue Me," the melodic "Running Blind," and the melancholic closer "Let's Midnight" could all find happy audiences with fans of the standard indie rock style of playing, however, those who like to be intellectually prodded as they listen to records will find little to stimulate them here.

By Ryan Wugalter
May 11, 2003

[reviews home] [list reviews]
 
comments powered by Disqus

More Reviews By Ryan Wugalter

Cover Art Ashley Park
The Secretariat Motor Hotel
(Darling)
Oct 7, 2003
Cover ArtAaron Booth
Transparent
(Boonbox)
Jul 23, 2002
Cover Art Epic45
Reckless Engineers
(Where Are My)
Jul 5, 2002
Cover Art Oliver Klaus
1967-1970
(Capt. Moze)
May 21, 2002
Cover Art Pele
Enemies
(Polyvinyl)
May 11, 2003
Cover Art Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Executioner's Last Songs V2&3
(Bloodshot)
Oct 9, 2003
Cover Art Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Executioner's Last Songs V2&3
(Bloodshot)
Oct 9, 2003
Cover Art Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Executioner's Last Songs V2&3
(Bloodshot)
Oct 7, 2003
Cover Art S.T.R.E.E.T.S.
Bo Bo Gnar Gnar
(Global Symphonic)
Aug 31, 2003
Cover Art Virgil Shaw
Still Falling
(FutureFarmer)
Aug 31, 2003
header bottom