Reviews

Read the Review
Plaster

Read the Review
Hyness

Read the Review
Black Suit Devil

Read the Review
Yamantaka // Sonic Titan

Read the Review
The Pack A.D.

Read the Review
Chad VanGaalen

Read the Review
Potengowski Anna Friederike

Read the Review
Todd Rundgren

Read the Review
Old 97's

Read the Review
Needles//Pins

Read the Review
Ohama

Read the Review
Nicolas Horvath

Read the Review
Hugo Wolf Quartet

Read the Review
Heat

Read the Review
Parallels

Read the Review
Monica Chapman

Read the Review
Alexis Baro & Pueblo Nuevo Jazz Project

Read the Review
Jenny Wren and Her Borrowed Wings

Share |


Cover Art

Oliver Klaus ( )

1967-1970
Capt. Moze ( )

Unless you lived in Quebec during the late 1960s, you more than likely have never been exposed to the sweet psychedelic sounds of Oliver Klaus. Finally enjoying a CD reissue, more than 30 years after its initial pressing of merely 700 copies, Oliver Klaus's 1967-1970 is a priceless artefact from a bygone era.

Comprised of Jerry Cushen on bass and brothers Bryan and Maurice Singfield, on drums and guitar respectively, Oliver Klaus grew out of the ashes of the locally successful Les Mini-Mod, who gained notoriety for performing in mini-skirts. Disillusioned by the public's interest in their costuming rather than their music, the boys in the band decided to concentrate less on gimmickry and more on composition and experimentation.

The result is the excellent 1967-1970, a melange of 60s pop, folk, rock, and psychedelia. Principal songwriter Maurice Singfield sounds uncannily like Stephen Stills circa Buffalo Springfield and the rest of the band, while a little less polished, follows suit with this comparison. Listening closely to the album one is forced to ask the question: Why didn't Oliver Klaus receive national acclaim similar to fellow Canadians The Guess Who?

The answer is simple. Though they had made many contacts through their constant gigging around Quebec, the group decided to retain complete artistic control by releasing the album themselves. Arguably, Oliver Klaus was the first do-it-yourself band in Canadian music history.

Oliver Klaus's 1967-1970 is a treasure for both the casual psychedelic listener as well as the vinyl junkie. This reissue includes the original LP in its completion, covers of tracks by Donovan ("Season of the Witch"), Jefferson Airplane ("3/5 of a Mile in 10 Seconds"), and even Neil Diamond ("Kentucky Woman"), as well as a slew of stellar unreleased live tracks. Hearing Oliver Klaus will make you wonder how many other great Canadian bands from rock `n' roll's golden era have drifted into obscurity.

RECOMMENDED TRACKS: "For The Boys", "Here Comes The Sun", "Feeling Groovy"

- Ryan Wugalter, CFUR Radio, Prince George, BC

By Ryan Wugalter
May 21, 2002

[reviews home] [list reviews]
 
comments powered by Disqus

More Reviews By Ryan Wugalter

Cover Art Ashley Park
The Secretariat Motor Hotel
(Darling)
Oct 7, 2003
Cover ArtAaron Booth
Transparent
(Boonbox)
Jul 23, 2002
Cover Art Epic45
Reckless Engineers
(Where Are My)
Jul 5, 2002
Cover Art Notes From The Underground
Notes From the Underground
(Stutter)
May 11, 2003
Cover Art Pele
Enemies
(Polyvinyl)
May 11, 2003
Cover Art Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Executioner's Last Songs V2&3
(Bloodshot)
Oct 9, 2003
Cover Art Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Executioner's Last Songs V2&3
(Bloodshot)
Oct 9, 2003
Cover Art Pine Valley Cosmonauts
Executioner's Last Songs V2&3
(Bloodshot)
Oct 7, 2003
Cover Art S.T.R.E.E.T.S.
Bo Bo Gnar Gnar
(Global Symphonic)
Aug 31, 2003
Cover Art Virgil Shaw
Still Falling
(FutureFarmer)
Aug 31, 2003
header bottom